72 common things ten years from now not existing today

72 Stunning Future Things 1

How many things do we own, that are common today, that didn’t exist 10 years ago? The list is probably longer than you think.

Prior to the iPhone coming out in 2007, we didn’t have smartphones with mobile apps, decent phone cameras for photos/videos, mobile maps, mobile weather, or even mobile shopping.

None of the mobile apps we use today existed 10 years ago: Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, Instagram, Snapchat, Uber, Facetime, LinkedIn, Lyft, Whatsapp, Netflix, Pandora, or Pokemon Go.

Several major companies didn’t exist a decade ago. Airbnb, Tinder, Fitbit, Spotify, Dropbox, Quora, Tumblr, Kickstarter, Hulu, Pinterest, Buzzfeed, Indigogo, Udacity, or Jet.com just to name a few.

Ten years ago very few people were talking about crowdfunding, the sharing economy, social media marketing, search engine optimization, app developers, cloud storage, data mining, mobile gaming, gesture controls, chatbots, data analytics, virtual reality, 3D printers, or drone delivery.

At the same time we are seeing the decline of many of the things that were in common use 10-20 years ago. Fax machines, wired phones, taxi drivers, newspapers, desktop computers, video cameras, camera film, VCRs, DVD players, record players, typewriters, yellow pages, video rental shops, and printed maps have all seen their industry peak and are facing dwindling markets.

If we leapfrog ahead ten years and take notice of the radically different lives we will be living, we will notice how a few key technologies paved the way for massive new industries.

Here is a glimpse of a stunningly different future that will come into view over the next decade.

All of these items were replaced with smartphones!
All of these items were replaced with smartphones!

3D Printing

Also known as additive manufacturing, 3D printing has already begun to enter our lives in major ways. In the future 3D printers will be even more common than paper printers are today.

1.    3D printed makeup for women. Just insert a person’s face and the machine will be programmed to apply the exact makeup pattern requested by the user.

2.    3D printed replacement teeth, printed inside the mouth.

3.    Swarmbot printing systems will be used to produce large buildings and physical structures, working 24/7 until they’re completed.

4.    Scan and print custom designed clothing at retail clothing stores.

5.    Scan and print custom designed shoes at specialty shoe stores.

6.    Expectant mothers will request 3D printed models of their unborn baby.

7.    Police departments will produce 3D printed “mug shots” and “shapies” generated from a person’s DNA.

8.    Trash that is sorted and cleaned and turned into material that can be 3D printed.

How long before you own the next generation VR headset?
How long before you own the next generation VR headset?

Virtual/Augmented Reality

The VR/AR world is set to explode around us as headsets and glasses drop in price so they’re affordable for most consumers. At the same time, game designers and “experience” producers are racing to create the first “killer apps” in this emerging industry.

9.    Theme park rides that mix physical rides with VR experiences.

10. Live broadcasts of major league sports games (football, soccer, hockey, and more) in Virtual Reality.

11. Full-length VR movies.

12. Physical and psychological therapy done through VR.

13. Physical drone racing done through VR headsets.

14. VR speed dating sites.

15. For education and training, we will see a growing number of modules done in both virtual and augmented reality.

16. VR and AR tours will be commonly used in the sale of future real estate.

Flying/Driving Drones

Drones are quickly transitioning from hobbyist toys to sophisticated business tools very quickly. They will touch our lives in thousands of different ways.

17. Fireworks dropped from drones. Our ability to “ignite and drop” fireworks from the sky will dramatically change both how they’re made and the artistry used to display them.

18. Concert swarms that produce a spatial cacophony of sound coming from 1,000 speaker drones simultaneously.

19. Banner-pulling drones. Old school advertising brought closer to earth.

20. Bird frightening drones for crops like sunflowers where birds can destroy an entire field in a matter of hours.

21. Livestock monitoring drones for tracking cows, sheep, geese, and more.

22. Three-dimensional treasure hunts done with drones.

23. Prankster Drones – Send random stuff to random people and video their reactions.

24. Entertainment drones (with projectors) that fly in and perform unusual forms of live comedy and entertainment.

Our driverless future is coming!
Our driverless future is coming!

Driverless Cars/Transportation

Driverless technology will change transportation more significantly than the invention of the automobile itself.

25. Queuing stations for driverless cars as a replacement for a dwindling number of parking lots.

26. Crash-proof cars. Volvo already says their cars will be crash-proof before 2020.

27. Driverless car hailing apps. Much like signaling Uber and Lyft, only without the drivers.

28. Large fleet ownership of driverless cars (some companies will own millions of driverless cars).

29. Electric cars will routinely win major races like the Daytona 500, Monaco Grand Prix, and the Indy 500.

30. In-car work and entertainment systems to keep people busy and entertained as a driverless car takes them to their destination.

31. In-car advertising. This will be a delicate balance between offsetting the cost of operation and being too annoying for the passengers.

32. Electric car charging in less than 5 minutes.

Internet of Things

The Internet of things is the network of physical devices, vehicles, and buildings embedded with electronics, software, sensors, and actuators designed to communicate with users as well as other devices. We are currently experiencing exponential growth in IoT devices as billions of new ones come online every year.

33. Smart chairs, smart beds, and smart pillows that will self-adjust to minimize pressure points and optimize comfort.

34. Sensor-laced clothing.

35. “Print and Pin” payment systems that uses a biometric mark (fingerprint) plus a pin number.

36. Smart plates, bowls and cups to keep track of what we eat and drink.

37. Smart trashcan that will signal for a trash truck when they’re full.

38. Ownership networks. As we learn to track the location of everything we own, we will also track the changing value of each item to create a complete ownership network.

39. Self-retrieving shoes where you call them by name, through your smartphone, and your shoes will come to you.

40. Smart mailboxes that let you know when mail has arrived and how important it is.

Full-body physical health scanner!
Full-body physical health scanner!

Health Tech

Even though healthcare is a bloated and bureaucratic industry, innovative entrepreneurs are on the verge of disrupting this entire industry.

41. Hyper-personalized precision-based pharmaceuticals produced by 3D pill printers.

42. Ingestible data collectors, filled with sensors, to give a daily internal health scan and report.

43. Prosthetic limbs controlled by AI.

44. Real-time blood scanners.

45. Peer-to-peer health insurance.

46. Facetime-like checkups without needing a doctor’s appointment.

47. Full-body physical health scanners offering instant AI medical diagnosis, located in most pharmacies

48. Intraoral cameras for smartphones for DYI dental checkups.

The future of computers is the mind!
The future of computers is the mind!

Artificial Intelligence (AI)

Much like hot and cold running water, we will soon be able to “pipe-in” artificial intelligence to any existing digital system.

49. Best selling biographies written by artificial intelligence.

50. Legal documents written by artificial intelligence.

51. AI-menu selection, based on diet, for both restaurants and at home.

52. Full body pet scanners with instant AI medical diagnosis.

53. AI selection of movies and television shows based on moods, ratings, and personal preferences.

54. Much like the last item, AI music selection will be based on moods, ratings, and musical tastes.

55. AI sleep-optimizers will control all of the environmental factors – heat, light, sound, oxygen levels, smells, positioning, vibration levels, and more.

56. AI hackers. Sooner or later someone will figure out how to use even our best AI technology for all the wrong purposes.

Unmanned aviation is coming!
Unmanned aviation is coming!

Transportation

Future transportation will come in many forms ranging from locomotion on an individual level to ultra high-speed tube transportation on a far grander scale.

57. Unmanned aviation – personal drone transportation.

58. 360-degree video transportation monitoring cameras at most intersections in major cities throughout the world.

59. Everywhere wireless. With highflying solar powered drones, CubeSats, and Google’s Project Loon, wireless Internet connections will soon be everywhere.

60. Black boxes for drones to record information in the event of an accident.

61. Air-breathing hypersonic propulsion for commercial aircraft. Fast is never fast enough.

62. Robotic follow-behind-you luggage, to make airline travel easier.

63. Robotic dog walkers and robotic people walkers.

64. Ultra high-speed tube transportation. As we look closely at the advances over the past couple decades, it’s easy to see that we are on the precipices of a dramatic breakthrough in ultra high-speed transportation. Businesses are demanding it. People are demanding it. And the only thing lacking is a few people capable of mustering the political will to make it happen.

Miscellaneous

As I began assembling this list, a number of items didn’t fit well in other categories.

65. Bitcoin loans for houses, cars, business equipment and more.

66. Self-filling water bottles with built-in atmospheric water harvesters.

67. Reputation networks. With the proliferation of personal information on websites and in databases throughout the Internet, reputation networks will be designed to monitor, alert, and repair individual reputations.

68. Atmospheric energy harvesters. Our atmosphere is filled with both ambient and concentrated forms of energy ranging from sunlight to lightning bolts that can be both collected and stored.

69. Pet education centers, such as boarding schools for dogs and horses, to improve an animal’s IQ.

70. Robotic bricklayers. With several early prototypes already operational, these will become common over the next decade.

71. Privacy bill of rights. Privacy has become an increasingly complicated topic, but one that is foundational to our existence on planet earth.

72. Hot new buzzword, “Megaprojects.”

72 Stunning Future Things 9
The safer we feel, the more risks we take!

Final Thoughts

There’s a phenomenon called the Peltzman Effect, named after Dr. Sam Peltzman, a renowned professor of economics from the University of Chicago Business School, who studied auto accidents.

He found that when you introduce more safety features like seat belts into cars, the number of fatalities and injuries doesn’t drop. The reason is that people compensate for it. When we have a safety net in place, people will take more risks.

That probably is true with other areas as well.

As life becomes easier, we take risks with our time. As our financial worries are met, we begin thinking about becoming an entrepreneur, inventor, or artist. When life becomes too routine, we search for ways to introduce chaos.

Even though we see reports that billions of jobs will disappear over the coming decades, we will never run out of work.

As humans, we were never meant to live cushy lives of luxury. Without risk and chaos as part of our daily struggle our lives seem unfulfilled. While we work hard to eliminate it, we always manage to find new ways to bring it back.

Yes, we’re working towards a better world ahead, but only marginally better. That’s where we do our best work.

Source: http://www.futuristspeaker.com/business-trends/72-stunning-things-in-the-future-that-will-be-common-ten-years-from-now-that-dont-exist-today/

The Satori Generation

Roland Kelts writing for Adbusters:
A new breed of young people have outdone the tricksters of advertising.

ONO KEI

This article appeared in issue #113, now available in our Blueprint for a New World Series Box Set.

They don’t want cars or brand name handbags or luxury boots. To many of them, travel beyond the known and local is expensive and potentially dangerous. They work part-time jobs—because that is what they’ve been offered—and live at home long after they graduate. They’re not getting married or having kids. They’re not even sure if they want to be in romantic relationships. Why? Too much hassle. Oh, and too expensive.

In Japan, they’ve come to be known as satori sedai—the “enlightened generation.” In Buddhist terms: free from material desires, focused on self-awareness, finding essential truths. But another translation is grimmer: “generation resignation,” or those without ideals, ambition or hope.

They were born in the late 1980s on up, when their nation’s economic juggernaut, with its promises of lifetime employment and conspicuous celebrations of consumption, was already a spent historical force.  They don’t believe the future will get better—so they make do with what they have.  In one respect, they’re arch-realists. And they’re freaking their elders out.

“Don’t you want to get a nice German car one day?”—asked one flustered 50-something guest of his 20-something counterpart on a nationally broadcasted talk show.  The show aired on the eve of Coming of Age Day, a national holiday in Japan that celebrates the latest crop of youth turning 20, the threshold of adulthood.  An animated graphic of a smiling man wearing sunglasses driving a blonde around in a convertible flashed across the screen, the man’s scarf fluttering in the wind.  “Don’t you want a pretty young woman to take on a Sunday drive?”

There was some polite giggling from the guests.  After a pause, the younger man said, “I’m really not interested, no.”

Critics of the satori youths level the kinds of intergenerational accusations time-honored worldwide: they’re lazy, lacking in willpower, potency and drive.

Having lectured to a number of them at several universities in Tokyo, I was able to query students directly.  “We’re risk-averse,” was the most common response.  We were raised in relative comfort.  We’re just trying to keep it that way.

Is this enlightened, or resigned? Or both?

Novelist Genichiro Takahashi, 63, addressed the matter in an essay 10 years ago.  He called the new wave of youth a “generation of loss,” but he defined them as “the world’s most advanced phenomenon”—in his view, a generation whose only desires are those that are actually achievable.

The satori generation are known for keeping things small, preferring an evening at home with a small gathering of friends, for example, to an upscale restaurant.  They create ensemble outfits from so-called “fast fashion” discount stores like Uniqlo or H&M, instead of purchasing top-shelf at Louis Vuitton or Prada.  They don’t even booze.

“They drink much less alcohol than the kids of my generation, for sure,” says social critic and researcher Mariko Fujiwara of Hakuhodo. “And even when they go to places where they are free to drink, drinking too much was never ‘cool’ for them the way it was for us.”

Fujiwara’s research leads her to define a global trend—youth who have the technological tools to avoid being duped by phony needs.  There is a new breed of young people, she says, who have outdone the tricksters of advertising.

“They are prudent and careful about what they buy. They have been informed about the expensive top brands of all sorts of consumer goods but were never so impressed by them like those from the bubble generation. We have identified them as those who are far more levelheaded than the generations preceding them as a result of the new reality they came to face.”

The new reality is affecting a new generation around the world.  Young Americans and Europeans are increasingly living at home, saving money, and living prudently.  Technology, as it did in Japan, abets their shrinking circles.  If you have internet access, you can accomplish a lot in a little room.  And revolution in the 21st century, as most young people know, is not about consumption—it’s about sustainability.

Waseda University professor, Norihiro Kato, points to broader global phenomena that have radically transformed younger generations’ sense of possibility, calling it a shift from “the infinite to the finite.” Kato cites the Chernobyl meltdown and the fall of communism in the late 1980s and early 90s; the September 11 terrorist attacks in the early 2000s; and closer to home, the triple earthquake, tsunami and ongoing nuclear disasters in Japan. These events reshaped our sense of wisdom and self-worth. The satori generation, he says, marks the emergence of a new “‘qualified power,’ the power to do and the power to undo, and the ability to enjoy doing and not doing equally.  Imagine a robot with the sophistication and strength to clutch an egg without crushing it.  The key concept is outgrowing growth toward degrowth.  That’s the wisdom of this new generation.”

In America and Europe, the new generation is teaching us how to live with less—but also how to live with one another. Mainstream media decry the number of young people living at home—a record 26.1 million in the US, according to recent statistics—yet living at home and caring for one’s elders has long been a mainstay of Japanese culture.

In the context of shrinking resources and global crises, satori “enlightenment” might mean what the young everywhere are telling us: shrink your goals to the realistic, help your family and community and resign yourself to peace.

What Takahashi called “the world’s most advanced phenomenon” may well be coming our way from Japan. But this time it’s not automotive or robotic or electronic. It’s human enlightenment.

Roland Kelts is a half-Japanese writer based in Tokyo and New York. He is the author of the bestselling JAPANAMERICA: How Japanese Pop Culture Has Invaded the US, and a contributor to enlightened media worldwide.

How the iWatch will change advertising forever

By Tom Goodwin, campaignlive.co.uk

Tom Goodwin, a director of the Tomorrow Group, explains how he thinks the iWatch will change advertising forever.

Tom Goodwin: a director of the Tomorrow Group

Tom Goodwin: a director of the Tomorrow Group

It will take a tiny screen to finally wake the industry up to what the digital medium really means – a bright future of the new, and not the mindless misappropriation of advertising platforms of the past.

It’s amazing how many opportunities we’ve missed mindlessly layering old techniques onto new media. We’ve got excited about better ad targeting, improved measurement, or the opportunity to do real-time marketing, but the vast majority of digital advertising innovation today still comes from the placement of ads and not the message. What an incredible waste.

In fact, the entire ecosystem of contemporary advertising is an absurdly unimaginative recycling of what we knew how to make, buy, measure and sell before. We’ve been stuck in a cycle of technological determinism, framing future possibilities based on previous technologies, and adapting models and structures of the past, to fit the form of the present

When the worldwide web presented us with space to convey brand messages, we did what we knew best: we mindlessly copied newspapers ads, digitised them and in a moment of genius, made them clickable.

When websites allowed page takeovers, we filled those pages with what we knew best (direct marketing) but we made it clickable.

The first brand websites became online brochures, but digitised and made clickable.

When bandwidth made branded videos possible, we just put on TV commercials.

Despite having access to over $10 billion of R&D budgets from new media owners like Facebook, Yahoo, and Twitter, we still see print ads in digital editions of magazines, we see flyers used as ads on Instagram, TV ads in Facebook feeds, and mobile ads that are essentially just tiny, electronic versions of newspaper ads from the 1750s.

The only thing we’ve invented is new terminology. We now have advertorials online, but we call them native ads, we have advertiser-funded TV, but we call it content marketing. We have had tactical print ads, but we now call it real-time marketing. Every single tool in advertisers’ arsenal today has been available since the 1960s.

apple-eyewatch-560

The digital world is a world of incredible abundance – it’s got the biggest creative canvas, the most incredible technology, huge optimism and boundless funding.It’s the best thing that could ever happen to advertising, and yet we all started lazily with what we knew best. Things will soon change. For the first time ever we will start to do what we do best, to think originally and to solve problems with creativity.

We’ve now reached a stage in which new technologies are forcing a paradigm shift, and it starts with the iWatch. When the digital medium becomes an extension of our senses, our minds, and our bodies, as [Canadian philosopher Marshall] McLuhan predicted, we have to consider not what we have, but what is possible.

When we’re faced with a new platform, with a set of unique characteristics, we have to rethink our approach to advertising: from pushing messages out to consumers based on past models of communication, to finding ways to add value and service, based on behaviour, needs and habits, and enhance their lives.

The future of modern marketing lies in starting afresh and seeing past pre-determined ideas about media platforms or advertising. For brands, the future is not in catchphrases like “real-time” or “data”. It’s about asking questions and exploring new territories:

  • How do you work with route guidance apps or GPS?
  • How do you link with data from social networks, based on proximity?
  • How should you use audio signals, NFC capabilities, or health inputs?
  • How are you leveraging real-time data like current, the news or the stock market?
  • How are you incorporating mobile coupons, or integrating with our calendars?
  • What becomes of the rise of the invisible app, how can your brand run as an assistive, typically invisible layer?

Maybe it’s about providing the information that you are located near a train station when the traffic is bad.

Maybe it’s the flash sale in the store you are passing, the beer voucher as your friend is close by, the suggested happy soundtrack to your can of Coke, the Gatorade after your gym session.

SmartWatches may or may not be here soon, and they may or may not work, but regardless, as a concept, they stand for what advertising becomes when the true power of technology, new media opportunities and creative thinking come together.

The future of digital advertising won’t look like advertising.

This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

The Coming Retail Evironment: Print Makeup Illustrates How It Works

 Imagine being able to make your own gorgeous, high-quality makeup at home, using any colors you choose.

That’s the future envisioned by Grace Choi, who made a huge splash this week when she presented a product that can 3-D print makeup at TechCrunch Disrupt.

Choi has created a prototype for a printer called “Mink” that will let users choose any color imaginable and then print out makeup in that exact same hue (at this point, she’s only done demonstrations with blush). By allowing people to skip the expensive department store prices to make the perfectly colored products themselves, Mink could completely revolutionize the makeup industry.

TechCrunch reporter Colleen Taylor asked Choi some more questions about Mink after her ground-breaking presentation to get a better idea of how the product will work.

Here’s what the final Mink could look like.

Although the prototype is currently the size of the average at-home printer, Choi says that the final product will be about the size of a Mac Mini and will sell for about $300, at least at first. There are two key features to this printer: It uses a cosmetic-grade dye that’s FDA-compliant, and, instead of printing on paper, it will print its colors onto a powder substrate that is like the raw material of regular makeup.

“It comes from the same sources as those products that you see on store shelves,” Choi told Taylor.

Choi’s product would let users find a color online, use a tool to find that hue’s hexadecimal number, and then print it. Every color has a unique hex number so you could literally print out any color.

She says that Mink will be targeted toward 13- to 21-year-old girls who are still experimenting with their makeup habits. That period is also when girls build confidence, she says, explaining that when she was growing up, she would sometimes have trouble finding beauty products suited for her skin.

When stores didn’t have any products targeted toward Asian women, she says she felt alienated. Similarly, when stores didn’t carry the more-exotic colors she was looking for, it made her feel like her ideas were abnormal.

“If they didn’t have a green- or black-colored lipstick that made me think that there was something weird about the way I was thinking,” Choi said. That thinking damaged her self-esteem, and she says that she stopped speaking up in class because she started believing that all her ideas were strange.

She wants her products to encourage young women to test out lots of different looks and have complete freedom over the colors that they choose, without ever feeling like their ideas were weird.

She says that the reaction to her product so far has been completely amazing.

“I’m really grateful. I’m really overwhelmed. I’m really excited about all of this,” Choi says. After a pause, “I’m speechless.”

Source: http://www.businessinsider.sg/mink-3d-printed-make-up-grace-choi-2014-5/#.U29c3YkazCR

Screenshots / TechCrunch

Editor’s Note: Expect many new and exciting products to come to market as 3-D printing takes off. This will revolutionize the retail industry over time as many OTC products can be replaced with a 3-D printer and their basic ingredients.

The Trend In Angry, Anxious Music

Loads of angry kids are looking for music with attitude as expression of their mood.

Modern punk styles are emerging in London telling raw stories from the street and what it is like being poor and white. With band names like The Meat and Onions Gang, Balkan Chavs, Skets and Run Shebeen delivering music that reflects the frustrations of the times.

For more mainstream music, the genre of music produced by pretty teenagers singing about their love life is giving way as negative social mood intensifies and the minor keys are emphasised with more arty, downbeat music. Lyrics that reflect anxiety and socially conscious themes will emerge with the times.
Source: London Evening Standard 10/10/11

Art as Social Mood

This cartoon picture “I Am Free” by Frode Johannessen going viral on social media at the moment reflects the social mood of our time. Compare this with the mood of the 90’s and 00’s when going to work was viewed as a positive experience. Social mood is always in flux, constantly moving towards a polar opposite in every area of human endeavour. Indeed this is very much the movement of the yin and yang observed by Taoist seers long ago.